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Ausrine Stundyte as Cio-Cio-San, Elizabeth Janes as Butterfly’s child and Sarah Larsen as Suzuki in Seattle Opera's production of Puccini's Madama Butterfly. Photo by Elise Bakketun.
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Original Article:
Maintaining Your Health amid a Hectic Schedule
Staff Megan Young, OPERA America , Brian Gill, vocologist; Katherine Keyes, Alexander Technique specialist; Doonam Kim, M.D.;
Making Connections1/28/2009
For most opera artists, staying in good health is crucial to staying employable. Yet travel, stress and interaction with others can make keeping the sniffles away challenging. This panel will share tips on:
  • Creating a balanced lifestyle
  • Dealing with anxiety
  • Resources for maintaining your health anywhere

Related Article(s):
Complementary and Alternate Therapies for Singers
Megan Young, Artistic Services Manager, OPERA America ,
Voices1/1/1900
In this information age, it's downright difficult to dodge the constant deluge of advertisements telling us how we can live longer, lose weight, gain weight, lose wrinkles, gain energy, and find inner peace, all from calling a 1-800 number and swallowing a magic pill (at the low, low price of only $60 a bottle!). Unfortunately, there is no magic pill that will instantly transform you from a mercurial, vulnerable singer to a balanced, self-assured conqueror of the musical stage. But there are a multitude of complementary and alternative therapies that, when practiced with care and patience (along with regular check-ins with your primary care physician), can help you to achieve a better balance in your life, both professionally and personally. You are your instrument, after all, and taking care of your instrument should be your highest priority!
Singers and Sleep
Alan S. Gordon ,
Voices1/1/1900
When opera singers learn about sleep, it can be a real awakening. Sleep deprivation among singers jeopardizes their creativity, their productivity, their safety, and their well-being. The importance of restorative sleep to vitality and health and the dangers of even short-term sleep deprivation warrant a central place in the consciousness of every performer, regardless of the current stage of their career.
What to Expect at Your Voice Center Visit
Dr. Ingo Titze ,
Voices1/1/1900
It is a good idea for all performers to have baseline voice evaluations, even if they have never experienced vocal problems. This includes a complete medical history, endoscopic evaluation of the vocal folds under stroboscopic light, and assessment of the speaking and/or singing voice when the voice is healthy.
Allergies and the Voice
Dr. C. Gaelyn Garrett ,
Voices1/1/1900
Healthy voice use should first begin with a basic understanding of voice production. Normal voicing begins with airflow from the lungs moving past the vocal folds (also known as vocal cords), triggering vibration and resultant sound. The sound is then modulated by the structures above the vocal folds, which include the tongue, mouth, lips, and nasal and sinus cavities, producing what we recognize as the human voice.
Understanding Your Voice: Disorder Prevention
Dr. Kimberly Steinhauer ,
Voices1/1/1900
Voice health follows overall health. Prevention of voice disorders requires individuals to value all aspects of their voices. Voice health follows the overall health of your body — things that help you stay healthy in general also preserve the quality and function of your voice. Additionally, healthy living can enable improved recovery in the event of a voice disorder.
Maintaining Your Health amid a Hectic Schedule
Staff Megan Young, OPERA America , Brian Gill, vocologist; Katherine Keyes, Alexander Technique specialist; Doonam Kim, M.D.;
Making Connections1/28/2009
For most opera artists, staying in good health is crucial to staying employable. Yet travel, stress and interaction with others can make keeping the sniffles away challenging. This panel will share tips on:
  • Creating a balanced lifestyle
  • Dealing with anxiety
  • Resources for maintaining your health anywhere
Allergies and the Voice
C. Gaelyn Garrett, M.D, Medical Director, Vanderbilt Voice Center, Associate Professor, Department of Otolaryngology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center ,
ArtistLink7/9/2009
Healthy voice use should first begin with a basic understanding of voice production. Normal voicing begins with airflow from the lungs moving past the vocal folds (also known as vocal cords), triggering vibration and resultant sound. The sound is then modulated by the structures above the vocal folds, which include the tongue, mouth, lips, and nasal and sinus cavities, producing what we recognize as the human voice. The vocal folds vibrate very quickly, from 80 to 800 times a second, depending on the vocal pitch. You can imagine that a significant amount of friction can be produced by this amount of vibration, unless there is something to reduce that friction, which, in this case, is mucus lubrication provided by glands in and around the larynx.
World Voice Day 2011
Artistic Services Department ,
Original Content4/4/2011
As many of us in the opera field focus on the training of the singing voice, we are keenly aware that care of the voice extends beyond the practice room and performance stage. Maintaining one’s singing instrument involves a thorough understanding and consideration of the effects of diet, exercise, climate and sleep on the body and voice — all of which are variable and unique to each individual. While opera professionals are hyper-aware of their vocal health, voice care professionals such as ear, nose and throat specialists treat a number of patients who develop permanent vocal damage that could have been avoided with proper preventative care. As a result, medical professionals instituted World Voice Day as both a celebration of the human vocal folds and an effort to raise awareness of the vital role the voice plays in education, social interaction and careers in politics, business and performance, to name a few.
Stress Management for Opera Artists
Robin Rigby, stress management consultant ,
Making Connections12/15/2011
Stress is often unavoidable, especially in the competitive and grueling world of opera. Fortunately, there are proven methods of reducing and managing stress and the factors that cause it. At this session you will learn how to effectively deal with stress so that you can stay healthy, productive and achieve your goals as an artist.

Summer 2014 Magazine Issue
  • Summer Apprenticeships
  • Opera Tours for Board Members
  • My First Opera by Speight Jenkins
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