Username:
Password:


Forgot your password?
View Photo Credit  
Ausrine Stundyte as Cio-Cio-San, Elizabeth Janes as Butterfly’s child and Sarah Larsen as Suzuki in Seattle Opera's production of Puccini's Madama Butterfly. Photo by Elise Bakketun.
Search the Archive
Search Field:
Search Term:
Media Type:

Top 10 Related Articles by Date Published
Article

Create a FREE Artist Account.
Click here to learn more about donating at the Member level or becoming an
  organizational member.

How to be a Teaching Artist
Thomas Cabaniss, Neil Ginsberg, Amy Kirkland, Camille Zamora
Making Connections

Teaching artists educate and engage with community members through work in schools, hospitals and other social services organizations. To be successful, teaching artists must possess a wide range of business and interpersonal skills in addition to talent and artistry. At this session for all opera artists, panelists will discuss the types of opportunities available to teaching artists and how you can obtain the skills needed for success.

About the Author:

Thomas Cabaniss composes for opera, theater, dance, film and the concert stage. His choral works include Behold the Star, available on New World Records and published by Boosey & Hawkes. Recent works include three new orchestral commissions for Orchestra of St. Luke's and Carnegie Hall's Link UP! program (2010-2012), A Lad That is Gone and Watchman (2010), a cappella works for the Young People’s Chorus of NYC and Searching for Kristallnacht (2008), an oratorio for singers, musicians and actor. Other works include The Reclamation (2009); Noise + Speed (2008) and It’s All True (2007) for choreographer Hilary Easton; Three Sabbaths for the Columbia University Bach Society (2006); and Hilary Easton's The Short-Cut (2005). The Sandman, a chamber opera based on a story by E.T.A. Hoffmann, premiered at the Connelly Theater in New York in 2002 and was revived again in 2003. Cabaniss spends much of his time working as a teaching artist in schools and community settings, leading songwriting workshops in homeless shelters, senior centers and hospitals. He is also a member of the faculty at the Juilliard School and a member of Target Margin Theater.

 

Neil Ginsberg is an educator, composer and musician currently living in Brooklyn. He is a workshop facilitator with OPERA America's Music! Words! Opera! program and a teaching artist with the International Schools Theater Association. He has developed music, musical theater and drama curriculum for arts programs at the Henry Street Settlement, Encore Summer Theater Program, Berkshire Ensemble for Theater Arts, Hotchkiss School Summer Portals, Young Peoples Center for Creative Arts, Harlem Day Charter School, Essex Street Academy High School and Brooklyn Friends School, where he served as co-chair of the performing arts department. His choral works are published by Santa Barbara Music, Hal Leonard, GIA, Shawnee and Lorenz, and included on the American Choral Directors Association’s lists of recommended repertoire. He has written and orchestrated music for film, television and theater, and has music directed and accompanied productions Off-Broadway, regionally, with national touring companies and the Juilliard School of Drama.

 

Amy Kirkland is currently the manager of school programs at Carnegie Hall. In this role, she oversees programs that annually serve over 170,000 children, students, teachers, parents, young music professionals and adults in the New York area and across the U.S., as well as 100,000 people around the world through distance learning initiatives. In addition, she currently serves on the board of directors for the NYC Arts in Education Roundtable and on the steering committee for the Department of Education’s Arts Achieve project. Kirkland has more than a decade of experience as a musician, arts educator, teaching artist and curriculum writer. Prior to her tenure at Carnegie Hall, Kirkland was the director of curriculum development at Reading in Motion in Chicago. She has also worked with organizations including the Metropolitan Opera Guild, the Metropolitan Arts Council, the Peace Center for Performing Arts and Alabama Operaworks. She holds degrees in educational theater from New York University and vocal performance from Samford University.

 

Soprano Camille Zamora has performed principal roles with companies including Los Angeles Opera, Glimmerglass Opera and Houston Grand Opera, and has appeared as a soloist with ensembles including the London Symphony Orchestra and the Orchestra of St. Luke’s at Carnegie Hall. Zamora is the founder of one of the country’s largest annual AIDS benefits, which in the decade since its inception has raised over four million dollars for men and women living with HIV/AIDS, and which provides the model for Sing for Hope’s Community Arts benefit concerts. She is a co-author of Sing for Hope’s Art U! curriculum. For her contributions to the field of arts activism, Zamora is honored to have performed at The United Nations and the Fortune Most Powerful Women’s Summit. Zamora received her master’s degree and artist diploma from the Juilliard School.

Thomas Cabaniss composes for opera, theater, dance, film and the concert stage. His choral works include Behold the Star, available on New World Records and published by Boosey & Hawkes. Recent works include three new orchestral commissions for Orchestra of St. Luke's and Carnegie Hall's Link UP! program (2010-2012), A Lad That is Gone and Watchman (2010), a cappella works for the Young People’s Chorus of NYC and Searching for Kristallnacht (2008), an oratorio for singers, musicians and actor. Other works include The Reclamation (2009); Noise + Speed (2008) and It’s All True (2007) for choreographer Hilary Easton; Three Sabbaths for the Columbia University Bach Society (2006); and Hilary Easton's The Short-Cut (2005). The Sandman, a chamber opera based on a story by E.T.A. Hoffmann, premiered at the Connelly Theater in New York in 2002 and was revived again in 2003. Cabaniss spends much of his time working as a teaching artist in schools and community settings, leading songwriting workshops in homeless shelters, senior centers and hospitals. He is also a member of the faculty at the Juilliard School and a member of Target Margin Theater.

 

Neil Ginsberg is an educator, composer and musician currently living in Brooklyn. He is a workshop facilitator with OPERA America's Music! Words! Opera! program and a teaching artist with the International Schools Theater Association. He has developed music, musical theater and drama curriculum for arts programs at the Henry Street Settlement, Encore Summer Theater Program, Berkshire Ensemble for Theater Arts, Hotchkiss School Summer Portals, Young Peoples Center for Creative Arts, Harlem Day Charter School, Essex Street Academy High School and Brooklyn Friends School, where he served as co-chair of the performing arts department. His choral works are published by Santa Barbara Music, Hal Leonard, GIA, Shawnee and Lorenz, and included on the American Choral Directors Association’s lists of recommended repertoire. He has written and orchestrated music for film, television and theater, and has music directed and accompanied productions Off-Broadway, regionally, with national touring companies and the Juilliard School of Drama.

 

Amy Kirkland is currently the manager of school programs at Carnegie Hall. In this role, she oversees programs that annually serve over 170,000 children, students, teachers, parents, young music professionals and adults in the New York area and across the U.S., as well as 100,000 people around the world through distance learning initiatives. In addition, she currently serves on the board of directors for the NYC Arts in Education Roundtable and on the steering committee for the Department of Education’s Arts Achieve project. Kirkland has more than a decade of experience as a musician, arts educator, teaching artist and curriculum writer. Prior to her tenure at Carnegie Hall, Kirkland was the director of curriculum development at Reading in Motion in Chicago. She has also worked with organizations including the Metropolitan Opera Guild, the Metropolitan Arts Council, the Peace Center for Performing Arts and Alabama Operaworks. She holds degrees in educational theater from New York University and vocal performance from Samford University.

 

Soprano Camille Zamora has performed principal roles with companies including Los Angeles Opera, Glimmerglass Opera and Houston Grand Opera, and has appeared as a soloist with ensembles including the London Symphony Orchestra and the Orchestra of St. Luke’s at Carnegie Hall. Zamora is the founder of one of the country’s largest annual AIDS benefits, which in the decade since its inception has raised over four million dollars for men and women living with HIV/AIDS, and which provides the model for Sing for Hope’s Community Arts benefit concerts. She is a co-author of Sing for Hope’s Art U! curriculum. For her contributions to the field of arts activism, Zamora is honored to have performed at The United Nations and the Fortune Most Powerful Women’s Summit. Zamora received her master’s degree and artist diploma from the Juilliard School.


Fall 2014 Magazine Issue
  • Are Women Different?
  • Preparing for Klinghoffer
  • Emerging Artists: Act One


Contact Us
330 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001
P 212-796-8620 • F 212-796-8621
Info@operaamerica.orgDirections
From Airport:
The easiest way to reach the OPERA America offices is to get a cab at the airport. Cost is $40-45
(not including tip).
  • JFK - Take the AirTrain ($5 - approx. 15 minutes) to the Jamaica Street Station and transfer to the Long Island Railroad (LIRR). Take the LIRR to Penn Station ($12 - approx. 35 minutes). See Penn Station directions below.
  • LaGuardia - Take the M60 Bus to the Hoyt Ave/31st Street. Get on the or Train and take that to 42nd/Times Square Station. Follow the Times Square Station directions below.
  • Newark - Take the New Jersey Transit train to Penn Station ($15 - approx. 45 min). See the Penn Station Directions below.

From Penn Station/Madison Square Garden:
Leave the station through the 7th Avenue/33rd Street exit and walk south for four blocks. The building is on
the right hand side.

From Grand Central Station:
Take the Train to the 42nd/Times Square station and transfer to the Train.
Take the Train to the 28th Street stop and walk north on 7th Avenue.
The building is on the same block as the train stop.

From 42nd Street/Times Square:
Take the Train to the 28th Street stop and walk north on 7th Avenue.
The building is on the same block as the train stop.

For more detailed directions, most up-to-date pricing or to specify a different starting location, please visit the
MTA Web site.