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Ausrine Stundyte as Cio-Cio-San, Elizabeth Janes as Butterfly’s child and Sarah Larsen as Suzuki in Seattle Opera's production of Puccini's Madama Butterfly. Photo by Elise Bakketun.
North American Works Directory Listing
The Secret Agent
Michael Dellaira
J.D. McClatchy
Sam Helfrich (Director)
Sara Jobin (Conductor)
Laura Jellinek (Set Design)
Eric Southern (Lighting Design)
Melissa Schlachtmeyer (Costume Design)
Amy Burton (Winnie)
Scott Bearden (Adolf Verloc)
Nathan Resika (1st Secretary/Singer/Constable)
Andrew Cummings (The Ambassador)
Jodi Karem (Lady Mabel)
Mark Zuckerman (Prime Minister)
Jonathan Blalock (Stevie)
Matthew Garrett (Ossipon)
Aaron Theno (Michaellis)
Matt Boehler (The Professor)
David Neal (The Commissioner)
Jason Papowitz (Chief Inspector Heat)
Deborah Lifton (Lady Millicent)
Kate Oberjat (Lady Isabel)
Sarah Miller (Lady Verena)
Cherry Duke (Lady Olive)
March 18, 2011
Center for Contemporary Opera
London, 1900...A bomb has exploded at the Greenwich Observatory, an attack “having all the shocking senselessness of gratuitous blasphemy.” The unknown bomber is blown to bits. Chief Inspector Heat’s investigation leads to Adolf Verloc, a foreign provocoteur and his cell of terrorists. But the bomber turns out to be a mere boy...Verloc’s wife’s beloved brother, out on a mission he could not have possibly understood. A story of political intrigue among anarchists and government officials, murder and suicide, The Secret Agent is a story of social tragedy and intimate human drama, a story, sadly, for our times.

Conrad's masterpiece and the only novel he set in England, The Secret Agent (1907) is the terrifying tale of an anarchist plot to blow up the Greenwich Observatory, at the time the world’s most modern symbol of learning and science. With psychological acuity that penetrates into the backstreets of turn-of-the-century London, he introduces us to an unforgettable the cast of characters that includes foreign diplomats, police investigators, wealthy sympathizers, downtrodden victims, and a suicide bomber, each driven by callous selfishness and misdirected idealism in a story that, one hundred years later, seems all too familiar.
Intrigue, Anarchy & Sabotage Gone Awry Are Concerns of New “Secret Agent” Opera, by Dellaira & McClatchy - [Q] onStage 3/2011
Blood and Dirt - Operaticus 3/2011
Retelling the Tale of a Terrorist Plot - The New York Times 3/21/2011
Conrad's masterpiece and the only novel he set in England, The Secret Agent (1907) is the terrifying tale of an anarchist plot to blow up the Greenwich Observatory, at the time the world’s most modern symbol of learning and science. With psychological acuity that penetrates into the backstreets of turn-of-the-century London, he introduces us to an unforgettable the cast of characters that includes foreign diplomats, police investigators, wealthy sympathizers, downtrodden victims, and a suicide bomber, each driven by callous selfishness and misdirected idealism in a story that, one hundred years later, seems all too familiar.
01:45
2
4 principals, 6 secondary
Chamber orchestra of 12
Michael Dellaira
mrd@michaeldellaira.com
http://www.michaeldellaira.com

Summer 2014 Magazine Issue
  • Summer Apprenticeships
  • Opera Tours for Board Members
  • My First Opera by Speight Jenkins
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