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Ausrine Stundyte as Cio-Cio-San, Elizabeth Janes as Butterfly’s child and Sarah Larsen as Suzuki in Seattle Opera's production of Puccini's Madama Butterfly. Photo by Elise Bakketun.
North American Works Directory Listing
A Flowering Tree
John Adams
One of America’s most admired and respected composers, John Adams is a musician of enormous range and technical command. His works, both operatic and symphonic, stand out among contemporary classical compositions for their depth of expression, brilliance of sound, and the profoundly humanist nature of their themes. Over the past 25 years, Adams’s music has played a decisive role in turning the tide of contemporary musical aesthetics away from academic modernism and toward a more expansive, expressive language, entirely characteristic of his New World surroundings.

The official John Adams website is www.earbox.com. The music of John Adams is published by Boosey & Hawkes and Associated Music Publishers.
Peter Sellars
Peter Sellars, Director
John Adams, Conductor
Orquesta Joven Camerata de Venezuela
Schola Cantorum Caracas
Storyteller: Eric Owens
The Prince: Russell Thomas
Kumudha: Jessica Rivera
http://www.earbox.com/W-flowering.html
November 14, 2006
New Crowned Hope Festival
In the 2000-year-old South Indian folk tale A Flowering Tree, a beautiful girl named Kumudha devises a plan to help her impoverished family: she transforms herself into a tree, from which she and her sister gather the fragrant flowers, weave them into garlands, and sell them at the marketplace. They carefully perform the ritual, which requires two pitchers of water for Kumudha to turn into the tree, and two pitchers of water for her to turn back into human form.

The local prince spies on her and wants her for his wife. After their wedding, the prince commands Kumudha to perform the transformation for him. She complies, but his sister watches from a hiding place and, envious of her sister-in-law’s powers, forces Kumudha to perform the ritual for her and a group of her friends.

After Kumudha turns into a tree, they break her branches, tear off her flowers, and abandon her, neglecting the water ritual which would revert her back into human shape. Trapped in a netherworld, not quite tree, not quite human, Kumudha is eventually rescued by a band of minstrels, who incorporate her into their travelling act because she can sing exquisitely.

Meanwhile the prince, distraught at his wife’s disappearance, wanders through the country as a beggar. After a long time he ends up at his sister’s palace (she has since become a queen). Barely recognizing him, she takes him in.

When she hears about a travelling minstrel troupe and a strange tree-woman with a heavenly voice, she summons the broken hybrid to the palace, in hopes it will help the prince. At once the prince recognizes his wife’s voice, and with pitchers of water restores her to her human self.
Kumudha(lyr s)
The Prince(t)
Storyteller(bar)
Boy Meets Girl, Boy Loses Girl, Love Blooms (Literally) - New York Times, Anne Midgette, 11/16/06
Adapted from the ancient Indian folktale and poetry in translations by Attipat Krishnaswami Ramanujan.
02:30
2
SATB Chorus (min. 40)
2 picc.treble recorder(=perc, opt. pic), alto recorder(=soprano recorder, perc, opt.fl)*, 2 ob(Eng Hrn), 2 bcl, 2 bsn(dbn) - 4 hrn, 2 tpt, 3 tbn - timp, 4 perc(glsp, wdbl, claves, pedal BD, SD, 2 susp cyms, 2 tuned bongos(or roto toms), tom-t, shaker, 3 tpl blks, cowbell, bongo, maracas, BD, 2 Japanese Bowl gong, Chinese cym, 2 tgls, slapstick/chimes, tgl, tamb, wdbl, susp cym, rainmaker(med), BD, cast, bongo, SD/maracas, tamb, rainmaker(low), high tgl, low tubular wind chimes/shaker, rainmaker(low)) - hp - cel - str(min 12 vln1, 10 vln 2, 8 vla, 6 vc, 5 db) *OPTIONAL: recorder players play some very simple percussion (rainsticks, etc) or they can play only recorder.
Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.
229 W 28th Street, Floor 11
New York, NY 10001
composers.us@boosey.com
212-358-5300
http://www.boosey.com
The Opera Fund Awardee Information
2007 Audience Development Project
A FLOWERING TREE: Opera Insights and Opera for All
Chicago Opera Theater
2011 Robert L.B. Tobin Director-Designer Showcase
A Flowering Tree
Austin McCormick
Austin McCormick
Set and Costume Designer: Zane Pihlstrom, Lighting Designer: Gina Scherr
Hari Krishnan


"In the 2000-year-old South Indian folk tale A Flowering Tree, a beautiful girl named Kumudha devises a plan to help her impoverished family: she transforms herself into a tree, from which she and her sister gather the fragrant flowers, weave them into garlands, and sell them at the marketplace "
About the 2011 Robert L.B. Tobin Director-Designer Showcase
This bi-annual program is offered as part of OPERA America’s continuing effort to foster emerging opera artists. The showcase, made possible through support from the Tobin Theatre Arts Fund, has been established to bring promising talent to the attention of the field and connect promising directors and designers with those who are in a position to advance their careers. Twenty-seven director-driven teams submitted proposals for consideration in this second showcase round. Four finalist teams were selected by panelists Donald Eastman, designer; Kevin Patterson, general director, Austin Lyric Opera; Tazewell Thompson, stage director; and Diane Wondisford, producing director, Music-Theatre Group. As opera is an intrinsically collaborative art form, the projects chosen were selected not only because they demonstrate the requisite creativity and skill, but because they display true collaboration, creative vibrancy and collective passion.

Each team is given $2,000 to be used toward further research and the production of more comprehensive renderings and models. Up to two representatives from each finalist team receive travel, lodging and registration to attend Opera Conference 2011 in Boston, MA to present their proposals to opera producers at a special session and to network with conference attendees.
Schedule of Performances Listings
A Flowering Tree (Adams)
Thursday, June 30, 2011 - Cincinnati Opera
A Flowering Tree (Adams)
Wednesday, May 14, 2008 - Chicago Opera Theater

Spring 2014 Magazine Issue
  • From Gold Rush to Google
  • Before, After and During Opera Conference 2014
  • OPERA America's New Works Forum Expands and Explores
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