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Ausrine Stundyte as Cio-Cio-San, Elizabeth Janes as Butterfly’s child and Sarah Larsen as Suzuki in Seattle Opera's production of Puccini's Madama Butterfly. Photo by Elise Bakketun.
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Administrator/Trustee Resources & Archives
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About the Archives
OPERA America’s comprehensive Archive, containing hundreds of articles, podcasts and videos, is a rich resource of information for artists, company staff and opera patrons alike.

The Archive contains articles from 1999 to the present, covering topics like fundraising, health, marketing, new works, performance skills, mentoring and finance, written by OPERA America staff and outside industry experts.

Podcasts and videos in the Archive provide invaluable access to OPERA America events such as the Annual Conference and Making Connections.

Full access to the Archive content is available only to OPERA America members. If you are not a member, please view the membership page to learn more.
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From the Archives Popular Administrative/Trustee Resources
A Legacy of Leadership
Kelley Rourke
Each year, OPERA America honors leaders celebrating their 10- and 25-year anniversaries with an opera company. The recipients of this year's service awards hail from companies from across North America whose annual budgets range in size from less than $1 million to more than $25 million. Some of the companies dominate the opera scene in their cities, while others are part of a vibrant local opera ecology.

Running an opera company is challenging in the best of times, and today's uncertain economy makes it extraordinarily difficult to plan the seasons ahead. But with hard-won wisdom gained from many years of experience, these artistic and general directors strike a tone of cautious optimism as they share their learning and confirm their commitment to quality and creativity.
Advocacy & Public Policy Update
About OPERA America's Advocacy Efforts Latest News & Alerts
OPERA America represents the interests of the opera community before Congress, the White House and federal agencies. As a founding member of the Performing Arts Alliance, OPERA America works with the performing arts field to advocate for the development of national policies that recognize and strengthen the contributions that the arts make to America.

For more information on OPERA America’s advocacy activities, please contact OPERA America’s Government Affairs Office at 202-375-7523.
#Opera in 140 characters
Friday, April 18, 2014
Latest Video & Audio Additions
Visa Processing for Foreign Guest Artists
Jonathan Ginsburg and Andi Floyd, FTM Arts Law
Fundraising for Independent Artists
Dianne Debicella, program director, fiscal sponsorship, Fractured Atlas; Eve Gigliotti, mezzo-soprano; Anne Ricci, general managing diva, Opera on Tap
Taxing Foreign Artists
Robyn Guilliams, FTM Arts Law attorney, Larry Bomback, Director of Finance, OPERA America, Amy Fitterer, Director of Government Affairs, OPERA America
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Current Headlines
What is the Future of Arts Journalism?
By Robert BettmannARTSblogMonday, July 28, 2014
Arts journalism is changing rapidly. Newspaper coverage has shifted, and the number of blogs and small magazines covering the arts has grown exponentially. While it’s uncertain what the structural changes in arts journalism will mean for the arts over the next twenty years, changes are happening and affecting audience participation.
American Opera, Rising
By Eileen CunniffeNonprofit QuarterlyMonday, July 28, 2014
Los Angeles Times music critic Mark Swed wrote a compelling piece last week exploring the state of opera in American cities and, notably, the increase in new American works of opera as a means of keeping the artistic discipline relevant and appealing to 21st-century American audiences. “The art form is not standing still,” he writes. “It’s growing, uncontrollably, by leaps and messy bounds.”
The Future of Classical Music
By Diane RehmThe Diane Rehm ShowMonday, July 28, 2014
Classical music has thrived for centuries. But many say it is now facing its biggest challenges of all time, and risks becoming obsolete. Orchestras across the country face financial trouble, and there’s worry that the younger generations are connecting less and less with Brahms and Debussy. In response, many organizations are venturing into new musical and technological territory to attract loyal audiences…everything from intimate “living room” concerts organized on social media, to collaborations with pop and rock artists. A look at classical music’s place in society, and what’s in store for its future.
Following the orchestra leader
By Miriam Kreinin SouccarCrain's New York BusinessMonday, July 28, 2014
Since the Dimenna Center opened, another rehearsal space for the performing arts has sprung up in Manhattan.
Orchestra Faults Met Chief’s Record as a Lockout Looms
By Michael CooperThe New York TimesSunday, July 27, 2014
Facing a potential lockout that could halt work at the Metropolitan Opera when its labor contracts expire next week, representatives of the company’s orchestra sat down with the administration on Friday for their first across-the-table negotiating session since February. The meeting appeared to be less than harmonious.
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Summer 2014 Magazine Issue
  • Summer Apprenticeships
  • Opera Tours for Board Members
  • My First Opera by Speight Jenkins
Contact Us
330 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001
P 212-796-8620 • F 212-796-8621
Info@operaamerica.orgDirections
From Airport:
The easiest way to reach the OPERA America offices is to get a cab at the airport. Cost is $40-45
(not including tip).
  • JFK - Take the AirTrain ($5 - approx. 15 minutes) to the Jamaica Street Station and transfer to the Long Island Railroad (LIRR). Take the LIRR to Penn Station ($12 - approx. 35 minutes). See Penn Station directions below.
  • LaGuardia - Take the M60 Bus to the Hoyt Ave/31st Street. Get on the or Train and take that to 42nd/Times Square Station. Follow the Times Square Station directions below.
  • Newark - Take the New Jersey Transit train to Penn Station ($15 - approx. 45 min). See the Penn Station Directions below.

From Penn Station/Madison Square Garden:
Leave the station through the 7th Avenue/33rd Street exit and walk south for four blocks. The building is on
the right hand side.

From Grand Central Station:
Take the Train to the 42nd/Times Square station and transfer to the Train.
Take the Train to the 28th Street stop and walk north on 7th Avenue.
The building is on the same block as the train stop.

From 42nd Street/Times Square:
Take the Train to the 28th Street stop and walk north on 7th Avenue.
The building is on the same block as the train stop.

For more detailed directions, most up-to-date pricing or to specify a different starting location, please visit the
MTA Web site.