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Ausrine Stundyte as Cio-Cio-San, Elizabeth Janes as Butterfly’s child and Sarah Larsen as Suzuki in Seattle Opera's production of Puccini's Madama Butterfly. Photo by Elise Bakketun.
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Administrator/Trustee Resources & Archives
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About the Archives
OPERA America’s comprehensive Archive, containing hundreds of articles, podcasts and videos, is a rich resource of information for artists, company staff and opera patrons alike.

The Archive contains articles from 1999 to the present, covering topics like fundraising, health, marketing, new works, performance skills, mentoring and finance, written by OPERA America staff and outside industry experts.

Podcasts and videos in the Archive provide invaluable access to OPERA America events such as the Annual Conference and Making Connections.

Full access to the Archive content is available only to OPERA America members. If you are not a member, please view the membership page to learn more.
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From the Archives Popular Administrative/Trustee Resources
A Conference Reflection
José Rincón, Artistic Services Coordinator, OPERA America
As I prepared to go to Houston for Opera Conference 2009 (my first OPERA America conference experience), I was excited to finally put faces to the names of the people I had been corresponding with over the last 10 months and wondered what the energy would be like being surrounded by hundreds of OPERA America members from around the world. Would stress levels be high given the state of the economy? Would there be network cliques? Would there be enough food? To my delight, I felt an immediate sense of collegiality among Conference attendees. There were no big dog/little dog complexes, no endowment envy. The current economic situation appeared to have strengthened an already existing sense of mutual understanding and solidarity between companies big and small.
Advocacy & Public Policy Update
About OPERA America's Advocacy Efforts Latest News & Alerts
OPERA America represents the interests of the opera community before Congress, the White House and federal agencies. As a founding member of the Performing Arts Alliance, OPERA America works with the performing arts field to advocate for the development of national policies that recognize and strengthen the contributions that the arts make to America.

For more information on OPERA America’s advocacy activities, please contact OPERA America’s Government Affairs Office at 202-375-7523.
#Opera in 140 characters
Friday, April 18, 2014
Latest Video & Audio Additions
Visa Processing for Foreign Guest Artists
Jonathan Ginsburg and Andi Floyd, FTM Arts Law
Fundraising for Independent Artists
Dianne Debicella, program director, fiscal sponsorship, Fractured Atlas; Eve Gigliotti, mezzo-soprano; Anne Ricci, general managing diva, Opera on Tap
Taxing Foreign Artists
Robyn Guilliams, FTM Arts Law attorney, Larry Bomback, Director of Finance, OPERA America, Amy Fitterer, Director of Government Affairs, OPERA America
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Current Headlines
Play it again: how to make an opera’s second run a success
By Tim MurrayThe GuardianTuesday, August 19, 2014
How do you make an old and over-performed opera feel fresh and new? Start by reexamining the score, writes one conductor
John Adams Explains Why His Northridge Earthquake Opera Took 19 Years to Reach L.A.
By Christian HertzogLA WeeklyTuesday, August 19, 2014
It’s not a musical — there’s no dialogue between the songs. 

It’s not a traditional opera — there are no musical transitions from one emotional moment to the next.

Composer John Adams calls I Was Looking at the Ceiling and Then I Saw the Sky a “songplay.” Librettist June Jordan calls it an “earthquake romance.” However their collaboration is pigeonholed, it hasn’t been heard in California since its world premiere in 1995 in Berkeley; the only professional American performance after its original run in Montreal, New York and Europe was in Cleveland 12 years ago.

In Surprise Finale at Metropolitan Opera’s Labor Talks, Both Sides Agree to Cuts
By Michael CooperThe New York TimesMonday, August 18, 2014
After months of harsh words and escalating threats of a lockout, the Met and the unions representing its orchestra and chorus looked into the abyss and reached a tentative deal early on Monday, agreeing to significant and somewhat surprising cuts.
Arts: When understudies triumph
By Nick GalvinSydney Morning HeraldMonday, August 18, 2014
After soprano Jane Ede heard she might be needed to step in at the last minute to the demanding lead role on the opening night of The Elixir of Love, her reaction was understandable.
"When I first got word there was a possibility I might be on, my husband found me on the floor in the foetal position going, ‘No, no, no, no, nooo’, because the task seemed fairly insurmountable at that point," she says.


Opera Goes Modern With Game of Thrones and Breaking Bad
By Max BartlettNorthwest Public RadioMonday, August 18, 2014
Opera is sometimes seen as stuffy, old-fashioned, even a little... you know. Elitist. But some operas are working to change that. Opera on Tap in Seattle works to make opera part of our musical pop culture, and Washington's Lyric Light Opera performs popular musicals such as the Music Man, and even adaptations of Beauty and the Beast.
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Summer 2014 Magazine Issue
  • Summer Apprenticeships
  • Opera Tours for Board Members
  • My First Opera by Speight Jenkins
Contact Us
330 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001
P 212-796-8620 • F 212-796-8621
Info@operaamerica.orgDirections
From Airport:
The easiest way to reach the OPERA America offices is to get a cab at the airport. Cost is $40-45
(not including tip).
  • JFK - Take the AirTrain ($5 - approx. 15 minutes) to the Jamaica Street Station and transfer to the Long Island Railroad (LIRR). Take the LIRR to Penn Station ($12 - approx. 35 minutes). See Penn Station directions below.
  • LaGuardia - Take the M60 Bus to the Hoyt Ave/31st Street. Get on the or Train and take that to 42nd/Times Square Station. Follow the Times Square Station directions below.
  • Newark - Take the New Jersey Transit train to Penn Station ($15 - approx. 45 min). See the Penn Station Directions below.

From Penn Station/Madison Square Garden:
Leave the station through the 7th Avenue/33rd Street exit and walk south for four blocks. The building is on
the right hand side.

From Grand Central Station:
Take the Train to the 42nd/Times Square station and transfer to the Train.
Take the Train to the 28th Street stop and walk north on 7th Avenue.
The building is on the same block as the train stop.

From 42nd Street/Times Square:
Take the Train to the 28th Street stop and walk north on 7th Avenue.
The building is on the same block as the train stop.

For more detailed directions, most up-to-date pricing or to specify a different starting location, please visit the
MTA Web site.