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Ausrine Stundyte as Cio-Cio-San, Elizabeth Janes as Butterfly’s child and Sarah Larsen as Suzuki in Seattle Opera's production of Puccini's Madama Butterfly. Photo by Elise Bakketun.
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Administrator/Trustee Resources & Archives
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OPERA America’s comprehensive Archive, containing hundreds of articles, podcasts and videos, is a rich resource of information for artists, company staff and opera patrons alike.

The Archive contains articles from 1999 to the present, covering topics like fundraising, health, marketing, new works, performance skills, mentoring and finance, written by OPERA America staff and outside industry experts.

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From the Archives Popular Administrative/Trustee Resources
Learning to Work Together: Opera Companies and Academic Institutions
Staff
In some cities, collaboration means local opera patrons experience a greater range of repertoire than they might otherwise. Opera Company of Philadelphia has developed a partnership with The Curtis Institute of Music to co-present one production each season, beginning with Golijov's Ainadamar in 2008. "We have always had a very strong relationship with Curtis," says David B. Devan, executive director of Opera Company of Philadelphia. "We learned there were certain pieces they wanted to produce for their singers, but the school didn't have the resources. It dawned on me that conservatories don't have a lot of marketing horsepower, but we were in a position to provide them with a substantially larger audience. We came up with an arrangement whereby Curtis would produce the show and we would market it as part of our season and then hand over the revenue, allowing them to pay their bills."
Advocacy & Public Policy Update
About OPERA America's Advocacy Efforts Latest News & Alerts
OPERA America represents the interests of the opera community before Congress, the White House and federal agencies. As a founding member of the Performing Arts Alliance, OPERA America works with the performing arts field to advocate for the development of national policies that recognize and strengthen the contributions that the arts make to America.

For more information on OPERA America’s advocacy activities, please contact OPERA America’s Government Affairs Office at 202-375-7523.
#Opera in 140 characters
Friday, April 18, 2014
Latest Video & Audio Additions
Visa Processing for Foreign Guest Artists
Jonathan Ginsburg and Andi Floyd, FTM Arts Law
Fundraising for Independent Artists
Dianne Debicella, program director, fiscal sponsorship, Fractured Atlas; Eve Gigliotti, mezzo-soprano; Anne Ricci, general managing diva, Opera on Tap
Taxing Foreign Artists
Robyn Guilliams, FTM Arts Law attorney, Larry Bomback, Director of Finance, OPERA America, Amy Fitterer, Director of Government Affairs, OPERA America
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Current Headlines
What makes a musical leading lady?
By Mark LawsonThe GuardianFriday, September 12, 2014
The word "diva" was co‑opted from opera to refer to powerful women in other fields. But, in three shows being staged this autumn, the metaphor is reversed by turning non-singing high-achieving controversial figures into musical leading ladies.
Why can't we hear more English operas?
By Rupert ChristiansenThe TelegraphTuesday, September 09, 2014
Rupert Christiansen makes the case for staging rarely performed British operas. 
Magda Olivero, Frenzy-Inspiring Soprano, Dies at 104
By Margalit FoxThe New York TimesTuesday, September 09, 2014
Magda Olivero, an Italian soprano who for decades whipped audiences around the world into a frenzy of adulation that was operatic even by operatic standards — despite the fact that by her own ready admission she did not possess an especially lovely voice — died on Monday in Milan. She was 104.
Korngold’s ‘Tote Stadt,’ one century later
By Jeremy EichlerThe Boston GlobeMonday, September 08, 2014
When Odyssey Opera performs a keenly anticipated concert version of Korngold’s opera Die Tote Stadt next week, it will be, strange to say, the first Boston performance of a once enormously popular work that premiered in 1920. The question of why it took nearly a century for this significant score to arrive here is natural to wonder, and not so simple to answer.
Kaminsky’s transgender opera “As One” makes a poignant and remarkable premiere
By Eric C. SimpsonNew York Classical ReviewFriday, September 05, 2014
American Opera Projects has produced a number of significant new pieces in its twenty-five-plus years, and the company’s latest does not disappoint. Premiered on Thursday night in the Fishman space at BAM’s Fisher building, As One, a ninety-minute chamber opera, is a rich addition to the repertoire. 
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Fall 2014 Magazine Issue
  • Are Women Different?
  • Preparing for Klinghoffer
  • Emerging Artists: Act One


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